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Free Eye Consultations We're offering free Schirmer Tear tests
throughout November to diagnose dry eye.
More Info Book Now Ophthalmology Month

Free eye consultations to high risk breeds throughout November

November is ophthalmology month here at Knutsford Vets as we seek to raise awareness of common eye conditions amongst pets. Throughout the month we’ll be offering free eye consultations for dogs at risk of keratoconjunctivitis sicca, a condition commonly referred to as dry eyes.

These nurse led consultations allow owners of dogs of high risk breeds to receive a Schirmer tear test free of charge. This will highlight any potential issues so that you can begin management and treatment of the condition to minimise long term effects on your pet’s wellbeing.

To find out more about dry eyes and to find out if your dog is a high risk breed, read the information below and book your consultation today.

Please note: although the initial testing is free any additional consultations and care that is required following the initial free nurse led eye consultation will be subject to a separate vet led booking and therefore an additional charge.

Is my dog from a high risk breed?

Although it can affect all breeds, some dogs are at a far higher risk of developing issues relating to dry eyes. It’s these dog’s that we’re keen to take a look at, so that we can adopt a more preventative approach to their eye care. High risk breeds include: –

  • American Cocker Spaniel
  • Bloodhound
  • Boston Terrier
  • Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
  • English Bulldog
  • English Springer Spaniel
  • Lhasa Apso
  • Miniature Schnauzer
  • Pekingese
  • Pug
  • Poodle crossbreeds
  • Samoyed
  • Shih Tzu
  • West Highland White Terrier
  • Yorkshire Terrier

Dr Paul Adams, has additional training in ophthalmology, ensuring your pet is in safe hands for their eye issues.

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Book your free eye consultation today to diagnose dry eyes in your dog

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What is included in the eye consultation?

This nurse led consultation is designed to help us identify the signs of keratoconjunctivitis sicca (dry eyes) in your pet. During your free eye consultation we’ll carry out a Schirmer tear test, which will help us identify if your dog is producing enough tears to keep the eye moist enough for it to work effectively. Many owners have dogs living with dry eyes that don’t notice or don’t understand the risks or discomfort associated with the condition.

By targeted high risk breeds with this FREE CONSULTATION we hope that we can diagnose keratoconjunctivitis sicca much earlier, to prevent future discomfort for your dog. If there are any adverse findings from the tear test we can arrange an ophthalmology consultation with our vet. This will set your pet on the right track and ensure your pet receives the medication required to manage their condition.

Please note: although the initial testing is free any additional consultations and care that is required following the initial free nurse led eye consultation will be subject to a separate vet led booking and therefore an additional charge.

What is dry eye?

Dry eye (keratoconjunctivitis sicca) is a painful condition where dogs are unable to produce enough tears. The outlook for a dog with dry eye tends to be good if the condition is noticed early and treatment is continued for life.

Tears are important as they:

  • Provide lubrication to the eyelids when they close
  • Provide nutrition to the cornea and conjunctiva
  • Help protect the eye against infection
  • Flush away debris from the surface of the eye
  • Stop the eye drying out

When tear levels are low dogs will often develop:

  • Itchy and inflamed eyes
  • A thick, mucoid discharge. This may be yellow/green in colour
  • Regular infections (bacterial conjunctivitis)
  • Corneal ulcers as the healing ability of the eye reduces

How is dry eye treated?

Treatment is centred on:

  • Tear replacement to help with lubrication and to stop the eye drying out. Unfortunately rarely can owners apply them frequently enough and even if they do, false tears are never as good as the real thing
  • Blocking the immune destruction of the tear gland. Trying to preserve the function of the remaining gland is really important
  • Stimulating tear production. Certain medications stimulate the remaining glandular tissue to produce more tears
  • Reducing secondary problems such as corneal pigmentation or infection with additional drops where needed

The mainstay of treatment is with cyclosporin (0.2%) available in a licensed preparation called Optimmune. If after 6 weeks, the response to treatment is not sufficient, we may use a drug called Tacrolimus. Lubricants such as hyaluronic acid and arbiter gels are also very helpful.

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